Renewing your registration
Continuing professional development (CPD) and HCPC registration
Your personal details and registration
Fees and payments
Professional indemnity
Promoting your registration
Returning to practice
Your queries / FAQs
Your online account
Meeting our standards
Raising and escalating concerns in the workplace
Fitness to practise

What is the purpose of the fitness to practise process?
The types of cases we can consider
What happens if a concern is raised about me?
What to expect from us if a concern is raised about you
What should I do?
The investigations process
What happens if the case is referred to a hearing?
Before the final hearing
At the final hearing
After the final hearing
Interim Orders

Appeals process
Leaving the Register
Practising outside the UK
Get involved
Feedback
Home > Your registration > Fitness to practise > What is the purpose of the fitness to practise process?

What is the purpose of the fitness to practise process?

Our fitness to practise process is designed to protect the public from those who are not fit to practise.


If a registrant's fitness to practise is ‘impaired’, it means that there are concerns about their ability to practise safely and effectively. This may mean that they should not practice at all. Or that they should be limited in what they are allowed to do. We will take appropriate action to make this happen.

Sometimes registrants make mistakes that are unlikely to be repeated. This means that the person’s overall fitness to practise is unlikely to be ‘impaired’. People sometimes make mistakes or have a one-off instance of unprofessional conduct or behaviour. Our processes do not mean that we will pursue every isolated or minor mistake. However, if a professional is found to fall below our standards, we will take action.



Print  Print page